Journey is My Path – A Book Review

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“The Universe is made of stories….”
Muriel Rukeyser

A book is as much a tapestry of words, as it is a narrative. And when a narrative takes the reader on a journey in search of answers that he can relate to, it becomes a hard-to-put-down story. ‘Journey is my Path’ is that story at the very least and at its best, it waxes eloquent as a tale of the modern times, the struggle of an individual trying to seek meaning in life.

The story talks only of ‘he’, the unnamed protagonist. He is born in a typical Indian middle class family, and from here the story of a person, trapped in the societal norms and expectations begins. The child turns to boy and thus he finds career and life choices waiting to be made. Things get complex as his life progresses and the reader moves with him from confusion to decision, apprehension to confidence. Along the way, he starts exploring his passion and finds himself through pushing his boundaries.

The telling of the tale is lyrical in its simplicity but at times I almost wished it to be a memoir; for a hide and seek of events and characters. The places the protagonist travels to are very interesting, yet I wanted it not to be in a chronological order so that as a reader, I could move from place to place without really knowing which gem he would stumble on.

I also wished that the book was peopled with diverse characters. There are many who cross his path and one almost longs to have a conversation with those who influenced his life.

The chronicle of the journey, literal and symbolic, is inspired by the writer’s own travel experiences and is heartbreakingly candid at places. Without breaking pace, it moves to a revelation that echoes the American mythologist, Joseph Campbell in saying that it is the person who brings meaning to life.
“Each of us has meaning and we bring it to life. It is a waste to be asking the question when you are the answer.” Joseph Campbell.

A very good read and a riveting tale.

Trablogger is an indie author and the book is available on amazon as an ebook. For paperback lovers, the book can be ordered through the author’s website.

Possessions

Five Photos, Five Stories- Day Two

I would like to thank Umber for inviting me to share my photos and my stories.

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Possessions? Clutter?

My books are my most cherished possession. All through my childhood, they were the first to be plucked off the shelves and packed, whenever we were to move. I painstakingly put them in piles as per their size, wrapped them in multiple newspaper sheets and bound the piles with twine. Then, they were left around for others to take inspiration to pack, and as a constant reminder of the inevitable move.

Today, I have much more that I would like to pack first, as many things vie for the coveted possessions tag in my mind. I would like to pack the photographs first of all, all the framed memories scattered around the house. I am aware that in my mind, I have come to cherish moments and memories just as much.

But, over the years as I amass more ‘stuff’, I am increasingly forced to confront whether I own my things or do they own me? Are my cherished things contributing to clutter? I am not a hoarder, yet there is so much in my house that I cannot part with. Things that signify pieces of me at various stages of my life. What must it be to be free of our physical possessions, using them as we need, rather than having them as a crutch to validate our purpose and existence?

The Five Photos, Five Stories Challenge rules require you to post a photo each day for five consecutive days and attach a story to the photo. It can be fiction or nonfiction, a poem or simply a short paragraph-it is entirely up to you.

Then each day, invite another blogger to carry on the challenge.

Today, I throw this challenge open to all my blogger friends. Try it, it is great fun!

Friday Listicles: Top 5 Literary Fixes

Being a voracious reader, I like to read book after book, with scarce a pause in between. I can be reading up to three different books at a time. When I am full of one, or overwhelmed with the thought thread in another, I only have to turn to yet another. Good books nourish the soul.  But there are times when I need some mindless reading, or something that is not too much effort but is good reading. I call such reads my literary fixes as they fill the gap in my reading and they are light and pleasant.

The Top 5 Literary Fixes

Re reading Classics
Classics are considered ‘heavy stuff’, with archaic language and difficult to follow plot line. Yet, there is nothing more comforting for me to turn to the familiar characters I have grown up with (I started reading classics at a very young age and had read many of them by the time I finished school) and relive their lives, struggles and emotions. I go down the familiar lanes, see the landscapes once again and wander the mansions. It is something I cannot do in real life, for people and places change every time I blink.

Western Novels
The wild, wild west attracts me like nothing else and because the uncertain, danger ridden, pistol toting, knife wielding characters always live on the edge, it is a perfect antidote to my staid lifestyle. Any time, I pick up a Louis L’Amour book and follow the protagonist across the deserts or on mountain trails, I come back rejuvenated.

Travel Literature
The Lonely Planet magazines are my best friend. They are always perched on my shelf just within reach. I pore over the articles and the magnificent photographs and sigh and dream. Well, some day….

Romance
The girl is lovely, simple, sincere and the guy is rich, arrogant and seemingly too good for her. Yet, ‘feelings’ develop and they inch towards a commitment. The key words are ‘simple’, ‘feelings’ and ‘inch’. These are the features of the romance novels I like. Yes, Barbara Cartland, Georgette Heyer…. They are old world and so am I. But, sometimes, books like Twilight seem too interesting and… delicious!

Good Housekeeping
This is the last but definitely not the least. Any time, I am fed up of the chores, the endless running about, the loooong list of things to be accomplished, I plonk down in a comfortable chair and check out the online version of Good Housekeeping magazine. The pristine houses and beauty of living spaces makes me forget my own shabby surroundings, badly in need of dusting. In my mind, I an repainting the kitchen cabinets a gorgeous red and getting the perfect floral centerpiece.

I would love to hear from you, my readers, about your literary fixes.

When the library closes…I pick up my pen

It sounds funny in today’s world, when we have kindle, ebooks, online reading material, bookstores and print reading material in plenitude, that the temporary closing of the local library would cause a lot of angst-to me. But, yes, it does, incredibly so. I am the kind of person who reads everything and anything. Fiction, non-fiction, travel, anthropology, animal behaviour, philosophy, mythology, comics, newspapers, tabloids, news weeklies, women’s magazines, pamphlets enclosed with pharmaceutical products, labels on food items… I cannot resist reading the newspaper pages that are used to wrap up my groceries. I can happily munch a carrot while smoothing out the creases in the paper bag that carried my vegetables so that I can read the latest data about what is causing the most pollution around the Taj Mahal.

Coming back to the library. They’ve closed it for a month. Is it snowing? No. Is the cold severe? No. I am enjoying the excellent sunshine everyday, cracking open and eating peanuts by the trayful. Is there a security issue? No. Being a small and peaceful place, the library has a few dedicated members only, the number you can count on your fingers. They just need a break! The people running the library, that is. So, I am left dreaming of the list of books I wanted to read.

Those rough and broad spines, the smell of the ink, the sharp edges of paper, the rustle of the pages, the weight of the books all add to an amazing sensory delight not to be found elsewhere. The hush of the library room, the footsteps sounding loud on the stone floor and the timelessness into which everything is suspended! Ah! how much do I miss all these! I start ticking the days off on the calendar to the day Paradise would open its doors to me once again.

In the meanwhile, out of desperation, I pick up my pen again. Typing and sending out my own written word has become easy on the electronic devices available. Yet, feeling the grooves of the pen, the smell of the ink and the large blots it leaves on paper is oddly comforting. Vaguely, I think back to all the long letters I used to write to my friends, relatives, editors of papers and magazines… I doodle, put a few punctuation marks here and there on the sheet of paper (I have stacks of them stashed away for just such an emergency) and write. Magic! Words flow, ideas take wings and my thoughts coalesce in a strangely coherent manner-something I had not felt for quite some time.

Thanks to the dearth of reading material, I decided to really write and it is a lot of fun.

The books I am reading now…

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom

A beautiful tale of a successful journalist getting the wisdom about life from his dying professor. The beloved professor’s proximity to death brings an amazing clarity of thought and this is communicated to his promising student in a series of meetings.
The professor Morrie talks of values, love, happiness…

Death ends a life, not a relationship.

Not Without My Daughter by Betty Mahmoody and William Hoffer

A true tale of an American woman and her young daughter kept hostage in Iran by her husband and his family. It is totally engrossing and very unputdownable. Still reading it.

Both books are set in the last century. Nineteen eighties and nineties. It is interesting to read something from that time although it was not so long back.

Get back to me with your current reads.

Siddhartha by Herman Hesse

The book I would definetly re-read, even if I do not have the time is ‘Siddhartha’ by Herman Hesse.

‘Siddhartha’ traces the spiritual journey of a young man as he goes through the various phases of his life, from youth to old age.

A simply written book, it brings forth the idea that every man has to look for his own salvation for knowledge can be communicated but not wisdom.

The eponymous ‘hero’ chooses his own path and is enlightened through his worldly and even sensual experiences as also through his life devoid of comforts and while being devoted to contemplation.

Herman Hesse was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946. He considered India as his spiritual home and this book explores the Indian philosophy.

This book rejuvenates me whenever I feel weary or confused.