Creating the Space to Write

Most days are just a jumble of everything. Walking the tightrope, balancing again and yet again. Managing this, that and the other thing. And getting to writing last of all; sometimes the last thing in the day even though it is the first thing on my mind.

Yet, the way all days are different even though they have an underlying thread of madness; all writing is different. Sometimes, I write in absolute silence, thinking of ideas, churning words in my mind, being with it completely and letting it all flow naturally. Everything comes together perfectly and I don’t want to change even an alphabet. At other times, I know what I want to write. I can sit in absolute clash and clang, people shouting or music blaring and write a brilliant piece. Unless my clothes at tugged at and I have food/art projects/broken toys pushed under my nose, I do just great.

I am a pen and paper person completely and I am proud of my writing instruments and the different kinds of paper I have managed to stock up. Yet, I know that it takes a lot of time to type what I’ve put on paper. Not just time wise but the trouble of reading my own scrawl. So, increasingly I turn to the keyboard for writing. However, to beat the block or write something momentous and from the soul, I still use a pen.

I don’t need a corner really, nor a desk. I don’t need a beverage or a sugary snack. The sofa would do, or the bed, or the chair with the bamboo jutting out. Once I start, I don’t know where I am sitting or what the time is. I don’t see the hues of the plants around me, or the dried out fallen leaves. I don’t see the sway of the trees even though these things ordinarily move me.

Writing is not an activity or a hobby or a profession. It is a pouring out in words what I am deep within. It is my emotions and impressions, my perceptions and experiences, my hopes and aspirations.

Where do you write? What do you need to create the perfect writing space and mood?

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20 Comments

  1. Your scrawl must be more legible than mine! I have to really concentrate to write well enough to read it later, which defeats the purpose of letting the muse flow through my fingers with abandon. So I end up spending all my writing time at my home office desktop, where it’s usually quiet and calm. Worst case scenario: kids playing outside on summer afternoons, or a cat insistent on walking around my lap.

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  2. I concur with your view in that once I start writing, in a flow, I don’t care for the what or where or when. I have always written all of my blogs in either the phone or the computer so can’t say about the scrawl (although my handwriting is terrible πŸ˜€ ).
    As for what spurs me to write, I’d guess its my overworking brain. Ideas keep running in the mind and sometimes, I have an epiphany of sorts. At those moments, I absolutely **need** to write.
    Beautiful post. πŸ™‚

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    1. That absolute ‘need’ is the most wonderful part of the writing process. Looks like everyone’s handwriting turns terrible as soon as we are out of school. (no extra marks for neat handwriting any more).
      I like the epiphany part! Hey, can you really write a longish book review on your phone? πŸ˜€

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      1. Ha ha. Couldn’t stop smiling on the neat handwriting part.
        I wrote all the book reviews on the phone itself. Its a lovely thing in itself. I mean, I love the writing on page part, the sweet smell of new paper and all, but I’m far too lazy to do double work. Write the blog on paper and then online too. πŸ˜€
        Plus using the predictive text to my benefit is also an encouragement. Not to say, the phone feels more intimate than the computer. To top it all, once you’ve adjusted the predictive text according to your usage, it really helps with the flow. The autocorrect takes care of all the spelling mistakes that can happen when we’re typing too fast, ideas just stumbling upon each other.
        πŸ™‚

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      2. Ah! You are so right about that double work. I hate that too.
        Predictive text is a real help but now on paper I don’t know the spellings of words any longer!

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  3. I’d been indulging the idea that if I had more time I’d write/read/blog more. And then I got more time and nothing happened. In fact I wrote less, and worse, I thought about it less. And then it all got very big in my head. And I believed I can’t write. I’m dealing to it now. An hour at a time, an hour of writing without expectations. Simply putting ideas and thoughts together on paper. It’s like building stamina and fitness β€”important to build gradually. And I’m very encouraged by your posts on your writing porcess, Sona, thank-you.

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    1. I am very surprised to know that you have had to deal with a writer’s block. Not only do you write extremely well, your presentation is innovative and impeccable. Yet, your mind led you to think that you cannot write!
      I myself need to do that one hour a day writing as you are trying. Gradually does it, as they say!
      Lovely to hear from you, as always!

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  4. Oh yes, I certainly do suffer from writer’s block. And at least part of the solution is, just as you say, Sona, in creating the space to write. Actually, I’m finding a book that another bloger recommneded months ago, very helpful. It’s an oldie but a goodie: If You want to Write by Brenda Ueland. She talks about how important it is to create the habit of writing, and to keep at it. Sounds simple, but it hasn’t always been easy to out in to practice, neverthelless, her book makes it feel achievable.

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